Dynamic Digital

A moveable feast: Digital records migration with a changing scope

Juliet Moore

Juliet Moore

Presenter: Juliet Moore - Te Runanga o Ngai Tahu, New Zealand

When: Tuesday 11.35am-12.15pm

Where: Plaza Auditorium

Stream: Dynamic Digital

A digital migration usually requires a specific scope and purpose. In this presentation I talk about the challenges and learning’s which came from a large data migration where the scope and timings constantly moved.

The Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Authority (CERA) was a temporary government agency set up with a fixed lifespan of five years to respond to the 2011 Canterbury Earthquake sequence.

As the agency moved towards closure, all records had to be migrated to eight inheriting agencies. This is a challenge in its own right, but with the addition of an unclear and shifting scope for these migrations there were many additional challenges.

I intend to discuss the technical, team, tracking, risk, auditing and communications aspects of these migrations.

With digital records migrations being on the radar for most businesses in the future there is a likely tidbit for anyone considering their own digital movable feast.

Accessing government-held information in the Digital Age – Risks and Opportunities

Rachael Rangihaeata

Rachael Rangihaeata

Presenter: Rachael Rangihaeata - Office of the Information Commissioner, QLD

When: Monday 4.20pm-5.00pm

Where: Plaza Auditorium

Stream: Dynamic Digital

There is increasing recognition in democratic countries across the world of the benefits of openness, transparency and accountability in building trust and confidence in government. Queensland’s Right to Information Act 2009 (RTI Act) recognises that government-held information is a public resource and that openness in government enhances accountability. The RTI Act represents a clear move to a ‘push model’ emphasising proactive and routine release of information and maximum disclosure of non-personal information, unless to do so would be contrary to the public interest. Federal, State and Territory governments have their own Freedom of Information or RTI legislation.

At a national level the Australian Government recently finalised membership with the Open Government Partnership, an international platform which promotes government transparency and making governments more open, accountable, and responsive. Australia’s first National Action Plan was submitted on 7 December 2016 containing 15 commitments focused on broad areas including: access to government information; integrity in the public sector and public participation and engagement.

The Digital Age poses a number of opportunities and risks for collecting, storing and accessing government-held information. Increasingly, information is being collected by government agencies in range of formats with increased reliance on instantaneous communications such as text messaging and social media. The volume of information collected continues to grow exponentially – much of it contains highly sensitive personal information. Successfully managing the privacy and security risks associated with large information holdings and adopting mechanisms to ensure the long term availability and accessibility of this information is fundamental to realising the potential opportunities for a more responsive, open and transparent government.

An innovative, user centric approach to achieve digital document management

Rebecca Lee

Rebecca Lee

Presenter: Rebecca Lee - Dept of Industry, Innovation and Science, ACT

When: Tuesday 10.50am-11.30am

Where: Plaza Auditorium

Stream: Dynamic Digital

The Department of Industry Innovation & Science took an innovation approach to increase its compliance with the Digital Continuity 2020 Policy by embracing information governance and taking a user centric approach to digital documents management.  Through the development of a ‘manage-in-place’ SharePoint 2013 system, the department delivered a platform which aids collaboration amongst staff while taking care of their record keeping obligations in the background.

The project was delivered using ‘agile’ project management methodology which saw the system co-designed through the establishment of a working group of user representatives from across the department.

Coupled with extensive change management, the system (DocHub) was designed and rollout out to over 2000 staff in the department (Canberra and state offices) within 8 months.

As a result of the project, the department has increased in 16 of the 18 criterion in the Check-up Digital 2016 survey. The department has now moved past the average performance of Commonwealth departments as reported in January 2016.

This presentation will look at the departments’ journey, including challenges, wins and lessons learnt from implementing a non-traditional digital record keeping system.

Assessing Business Systems compliance

Kye O'Donnell

Kye O'Donnell

Presenter: Kye O'Donnell - Votar Partners, VIC

When: Wednesday 9.45am-10.25am

Where: Plaza Auditorium

Stream: Dynamic Digital

The impact of the transition to a digital service model continues to flow into the records and information management profession. For many years (the modern era), the tools and techniques we used as a profession remained relatively stable, with incremental improvements being delivered. However, the era we are now in (post-modern) is characterised by rapid change, with new information sources enabled within days or weeks instead of months or years. For public sector entities the dominant form of a record is now data in digital business systems and the demands of information workers and citizens to discover, access and derive knowledge from these records is voracious.

What do these factors mean for our professional discipline? How do we transition our tools and techniques along with our businesses so that we continue to deliver value and enable service quality beyond traditional recordkeeping compliance?

Organisations today operate numerous, specialised digital business systems to support their operations, ranging from mission critical and enterprise wide systems to minor systems used by select staff. We can no longer expect all an organisation’s high-value information to be captured into its Electronic Document & Records Management System (EDRMS). The importance of these business systems and the information they hold depends on multiple factors, and the compliance requirements of these systems vary, depending on their function and contents. Records & Information Management professionals need to prioritise, assess and mitigate risks to ensure their most important systems are meeting relevant standards in areas such as information governance, information security, privacy, copyright and recordkeeping.

This paper presents a Business Systems Assessment Tool developed by Votar Partners. The first stage of the assessment is to conduct an initial risk assessment of each business system to classify them into a five-level system classification hierarchy. This allows the organisations to prioritise higher risk systems for detailed assessment and scale the assessment according to the level of risk. The assessor then responds to more detailed questions in a series of modules, depending on the classification level and the types of information held in the system. Once the assessment is complete, the tool generats the results and produces a visual report that identified key areas of risk and how they should be mitigated.

Digital approval . . . is that authorised?

Eric Swain

Eric Swain

Presenter: Eric Swain - National Archives of Australia, ACT

When: Monday 11.00am-11.40am

Where: Plaza Auditorium

Stream: Dynamic Digital

When was the last time you had to print something to physically sign and approve it, only then having to scan and then forward it on? Is that really a digital approval?

The benefits of doing business digitally are clear – it’s never been easier to communicate, action or process tasks. But there’s still often resistance to implement fully digital processes, especially when it comes to relying on a completely digital approval as the authoritative ‘record’. ‘Wet ink’ signatures are still used widely, often disrupting digital workflows with approvals being printed out, physically signed and then scanned digitally, sometimes multiple times. This occurs widely in Government and in the vast majority of circumstances there’s no good reason for it.

As part of its Digital Continuity 2020 Policy, the National Archives of Australia is supporting government agencies to remove paper approval processes wherever possible by 2020 and replace them with appropriate digital approval solutions, including system workflows. Digital approvals and workflows provide efficiencies for agency and inter-agency processes and interactions, while supporting the availability and ongoing access to authoritative, accountable and reliable digital information.

To support this change, the Archives are developing a Digital Authorisations and Approvals Framework for Australian government agencies. This simple tool will help to identify and implement appropriate end-to-end digital approval methods for internal or inter-agency business processes.

Once completed in 2017, the phased risk based framework will help to identify and mitigate risks that prevent using digital approvals for business processes, while providing implementation advice for specific digital approval methods. It will be available for use by information professionals, line areas and information managers.

This presentation will explore the Digital Authorisations and Approvals Framework and address what an organisation can do to better position itself to complete business transactions and approvals digitally with confidence.

Information Architecture and Semantic Ontology - A new way of thinking for building a search engine for the future

Linda Shave

Linda Shave

Presenter: Linda Shave - QLD

When: Wednesday 9.00am-9.40am

Where: Plaza Auditorium

Stream: Dynamic Digital

The key to competing in the global digital economy is business innovation and this includes dealing with large volumes of structured and unstructured data. The challenge is making this data findable and usable as well as providing the right information efficiently and effectively. A business prefix taxonomy is a good way of making content findable, accessible, usable and manageable.

This presentation will discuss the benefits of introducing Information Architecture and Semantic Ontology and the benefits to the business of introducing a business prefix taxonomy that is agile to change, can be incorporated across the enterprise and in itself become a valuable resource.

Is machine learning the future of records management?

Nicholas Fripp

Nicholas Fripp

Presenter: Nicholas Fripp - iCognition, QLD

When: Monday 3.35pm-4.15pm

Where: Plaza Auditorium

Stream: Dynamic Digital

As Records and Information Management professionals, we have spent our careers training staff, management, executives and entire organisations how to be pseudo records managers. How to identify what is a record, what a business classification scheme is and why it is required, how to appropriately classify records, where to save records and where not to save records, and how to structure like information together.  In addition, there is often the ongoing debate on whether the records management section should centrally control the corporate information or whether the staff should be trusted to appropriately capture, classify and manage our corporate information assets.

Traditionally, an organisation would develop a business classification scheme to identify the core functions of the organisation.  From there, the organisation is trained (often painstakingly) on how to utilise this classification scheme to create folders in order to group like documents together within one folder.  The staff within the organisation then develop a love / hate relationship with the classification scheme as they try to determine is this record really about Procurement, Budgeting or Accounting.

In a world abundant in technology, with each new day bringing technological advancements, are we as records and information managers ready to turn these scenarios on their head? Instead of training people on the principles of recordkeeping, are we prepared to train machines on the principles of recordkeeping and let those machines become our records management experts? Are we ready to relinquish the reins and enable records management to happen automatically in the background?

Don’t worry, this is not suggesting that records managers will be out of a job, in actual fact it is future proofing the role of the records and information management professional by transitioning roles into the digital workforce. Principles, frameworks, strategies, processes and procedures are still required, but instead of training the business in these processes it is training computers how to undertake the processes to meet our recordkeeping framework requirements.

Regardless of which EDRMS system is in use within your organisation, the smarts and designs behind these programs have progressed a lot in the past few years.  No longer is an EDRMS where records go to die, an EDRMS is a fully intuitive, integrated piece of software which can enable an organisation to work smarter, faster and more efficiently.  Leading EDRMS applications today are now equipped with some kind of machine learning capabilities, which means the EDRMS can learn processes and procedures without being programmed and they can teach themselves to grow and change when exposed to new data. Thus records management becomes a ‘passive’ activity for users, happening transparently behind the scenes while the user gets on with the job at hand.

What I am defining as machine learning within an EDRMS is the capability for the software to review and analyse documents that are placed within the system, and then make determinations based on the document’s content, related documents and other metadata on where to store the document, how to classify the document and how long to retain the document.  Records Managers can further train the system with sample records in order to improve the accuracy and confidence level of the system to undertake these processes.  Where previously staff members, records management teams or system administrators had to actively review and determine how to save the document into the system, what to call the document and where the document should be stored, machine learning enables these staff members to simply save their work into the EDRMS with little to no rules placed on them and the system undertakes the determinations on the staff member’s behalf so that records management occurs passively behind the scenes.

Machine learning can additionally assist an organisation to understand which information is missing from the EDRMS, and breakdown the information silos across the organisation. These systems can be trained to look for keywords, patterns and algorithms across the network to find all the information and records stored through the IT environments, and then automatically send these records into the EDRMS, or help to identify and reduce areas of duplication, redundant and obsolete records that are costing the organisation to store and manage.  Machine learning encourages staff to store information into the correct locations / systems and helps to streamline duplicated processes.

There are many benefits to be gained from machine learning in records management, including but not limited to, increased user uptake of EDRMS, reduced cost in training and change management, reduced storage and management costs, and increased productivity and efficiency in decision making.  The question then is, are organisations ready for machine based learning and will machine learning become the future of records management?

Linked up Government starts with linked up records

Katharine Stuart

Katharine Stuart

Presenter: Katharine Stuart - Dept of Finance, ACT

When: Tuesday 3.35pm-4.15pm

Where: Meeting Rooms P7 & P8

Stream: Dynamic Digital

In 2016 the Australian Department of Finance initiated the Australian Government Records Interoperability Framework (the Framework) to standardise the information needed to manage records across government.

The Framework includes is a set of related ontology modules, or components, that group together to describe the entities, activities, and characteristics involved in the work of the Australian Government.

In the digital realm, it is vital to keep a record’s context. By keeping context—preserving provenance—records are protected from becoming mute symbols of data. Ensuring the meaning, or semantics, of records, that is, how they relate to each other and to others things, is the goal of records management.

The need to manage the semantic relationships that allow information and data to continue to be records is a problem that has a natural solution in techniques associated with the semantic web, which is used to improve the discovery of information assets across the internet.

Leveraging these techniques, we can link-up records and build our way towards a more linked-up Australian Government. But why is linked-up government desirable? Imagine a situation where all interested parties could discover relevant and appropriate information assets (records) related to their query through a single user experience.

This presentation explores concepts associated with the semantic web, discusses the expanding and contracting domain of government and outlines the work on the Australian Government Records Interoperability Framework.

Moving in the digital world - breaking down barriers

Linda Macfarlane

Linda Macfarlane

Presenter: Linda Macfarlane - National Archives of Australia, ACT

When: Wednesday 11.15am-11.55am

Where: Meeting Rooms P7 & P8

Stream: Dynamic Digital

Information managers have been talking about transition into the digital world for over 20 years. More recently government policies and initiatives at all levels have pushed the digital agenda, with varying degrees of take up within agencies. This presentation looks at our complex digital world and the progress of information management by looking at government policy, Australian government survey data and a case study from an exemplar digital agency. Viewed together, these elements highlight where we have made concrete progress and help us to understand the barriers to digital information management. We will look at why are we able to make progress in some areas and in some organisations and not others; and finally, we will explore this knowledge and various tools can be used to progress and build on our successes, overcoming the barriers to improving information management practice.

Q&A Session: Data Trends and Opportunites for RIM

Jay Zaidi

Jay Zaidi

Presenter: Jay Zaidi - AlyData, USA

When: Wednesday 11.15am-11.55am

Where: Plaza Auditorium

Stream: Dynamic Digital

Q&A session will address questions related to RIM, what the latest trends are, how data science is now playing a larger role, the types of opportunities that will start arising out of the need for more and better data

The information hole known as mobile devices - are those BYO devices a help or a hindrance?

Julie Coxall

Julie Coxall

Emma Garbelini

Emma Garbelini

Presenters: Julie Coxall - City of Armadale, WA & Emma Garbelini - City of Armadale, WA

When: Monday 1.30pm-2.10pm

Where: Plaza Auditorium

Stream: Dynamic Digital

The phenomenon of using mobile devices in the work place is changing the dynamics of how information is received, shared and saved.  Just what devices are being used and how they are being used is a challenge for all Information Professionals.  This workshop will deliberate, consider and ruminate the positive and negative aspects of user friendly interfaces that are now being used as business tools whether they are allowed or not by IT policy and guidelines.  Controlling the perception of mobiles devices as a required business tool can impose a risk to information security and require different levels of control over each respective system.

Gone are the traditional simple media devices of jump drives, CD’s, DVD’s and music players without Wi-Fi, instead we welcome “Smart” media devices where data can be transferred, emails accounts accessed, internet search executed and download applications, information, music and even books.  Welcome to the world of  tablets, iPhone, ereaders, and iPad  devices that are small in size and portable, easy to use but have best practice requirements in the corporate world.   

However, these devices bring increase efficiencies through enhanced communication and connectivity to the work environment from remote environments.   Improved communication and access to customer information details when you’re away from the office.  Enable your customers to make payment for goods and services without leaving their home or work place.  This interactive discussion will provide a thought provoking exchange of concepts, ideas and theories that will enlighten participants with knowledge and insight into the digital mobile world.

The state of Social Media Archiving in Australia

Carmen Angerer

Carmen Angerer

Presenter: Carmen Angerer - Ladoo, VIC

When: Monday 2.15pm-2.55pm

Where: Plaza Auditorium

Stream: Dynamic Digital

Learn about the global state of social media archiving and take part in a discussion about the importance of social media, freedom of information requests and case studies. Learn strategies to help your organisation manage social media records.

Where to for the Recordkeeping profession - Snow White or Zombie Army?

Andy Carnahan

Andy Carnahan

Presenter: Andy Carnahan - NSW

When: Tuesday 3.35pm-4.15pm

Where: Plaza Auditorium

Stream: Dynamic Digital

Search engines can find a needle in haystack but who stacks the hay? Looking at information management from a 30-year career in IT, it seems that record keepers are still pining for the relevance they had in the pre-office automation period.

Apart from providing a digitising mail-room and writing record keeping policies that are largely unenforceable and unenforced, what role is there for the profession of record keeping? 

An exploration of information content and context using the Bible as a pre-internet Wikipedia to the Voyager Golden Record and to the promise of human quality / machine speed classification.

An irreverent but respectful challenge to the Record keeping profession. A presentation free of actionable insights and Buzzfeed hyperbole.

Why are we still signing paper? How to implement electronic signatures in a way that is compliant

Lydia Loriente

Lydia Loriente

Presenter: Lydia Loriente - Monash University, VIC

When: Monday 11.45am-12.25pm

Where: Plaza Auditorium

Stream: Dynamic Digital

More and more business processes are being done electronically, using everything from email up to complex software and business information systems. ‘Born digital’ records are encouraged to be managed digitally, and the generation of paper-based records is in decline. One of the final frontiers for moving business recordkeeping to digital formats is signatures, or approvals.

In Western culture, there is a strong history of obtaining a hand-drawn mark or signature as proof of approving or consenting to something. Obtaining and handling these paper-based signatures is becoming increasingly difficult given that most other business processes are, or soon will be, electronic.

This presentation asks, why are we still signing paper, and how can we stop, in a way that is complaint?

This presentation will cover such issues as:

  • when a digital approval is allowed
  • what makes a digital approval compliant
  • the many forms a digital approval can take: e.g. email, online form, workflow and more
  • an action plan to stop signing paper and start approving digitally
  • potential methods for ensuring that the record of the compliant approval can be found and accessed over time.

In most cases digital approvals are allowed, so what’s stopping us from going digital? Attendees will walk away with an understanding of the common barriers to digital approvals, and some strategies to overcome them.

Download Registration Form and Program