RIM 101

'Let's start at the very beginning . .' - developing an information management standard for the Australian Government

Esther Carey

Esther Carey

Presenter: Esther Carey - National Archives of Australia, ACT

When: Tuesday 1.30pm-2.10pm

Where: Sky S1

Stream: RIM 101

Sometimes the basics are clear – as Maria, and Gretl, inform us in the Sound of Music, ‘when you read you begin with A-B-C / when you sing you begin with do-re-mi’.  However, what are the basics, or fundamentals, for managing information within a government jurisdiction?

The benefits of well managed information to support business activity, rights and entitlements, community expectations, as well as corporate and cultural memory are relatively easy to define. Endeavouring to articulate what action is required to achieve well managed business information to realise these outcomes, in largely non-technical language, is not quite so simple.

In 2016 the National Archives of Australia (the Archives) developed an information management standard for the Australian Government jurisdiction (the Standard). The impetus for its development came from an identified need for clear advice to outline fundamental principles for the creation and management of Australian Government business information. The Standard provides the basis for a common understanding of how agencies can protect and realise the value of their business information to maximise efficient and accountable use and reuse. It enables capability improvement through authoritative good practice guidance, while allowing flexibility in implementation methods, to achieve the principle based outcomes of the Standard. The Standard is consistent with the key concepts and principles of International Standard ISO 15489 (2016) Records Management.  It underpins existing policies and guidance, including Digital Continuity 2020, and is the foundation for our future advice.

This presentation will explain the reasons behind developing a jurisdiction-specific information management standard, outline the consultative process undertaken to do so, and summarise the resulting eight principles that now make up the Standard.

A decentralised approach to records capture

Demos Gouglas

Demos Gouglas

Presenter: Demos Gouglas - EzeScan, QLD

When: Wednesday 11.15am-11.55am

Where: Sky S1

Stream: RIM 101

Many organisations undergoing digital transformation are turning to decentralised capture solutions in the attempt to simplify electronic records management and add value to their business processes.
This presentation will explore the requirements for organisations to satisfy records digitisation, compliance and governance standards while processing and managing digital assets in real time.

Are we asking for the right competencies?

Katherine Clarke

Katherine Clarke

Presenter: Katherine Clarke - New Zealand

When: Monday 2.15pm-2.55pm

Where: Sky S1

Stream: RIM 101

Are employers getting the basics right when recruiting information and records management staff? Archives New Zealand was concerned that more than 10 years after the Public Records Act, audit findings indicated recordkeeping maturity in central government organisations was poor.

My research, part of a research project while completing a Master of Information Studies, examines what employers were asking for and valued during recruitment. The findings were compared with Australasian research and recordkeeping frameworks. This shed light on similarities, differences, and gaps – all of which are applicable for Australian and New Zealand employers and practitioners.

Perceptions on value were sometimes contradictory but when delving deeper – the validity of differing perspectives became more evident.  Comparisons with the frameworks also highlighted curious differences around supporting business outcomes, education, and the risks employers face in understanding the capability of potential job candidates – and the impact these factors can have on organisational outcomes.

Employers will find the analysis useful for better understanding the value of specific competencies when recruiting information and records practioners. Practitioners will find the research useful in  uncovering baseline competencies – as part of an ongoing career development plan.

As it was in the beginning

Mimma Sardi

Mimma Sardi

Maree Brennen

Maree Brennen

Presenters: Mimma Sardi - Dept of Transport, WA & Maree Brennen - Main Roads WA, WA

When: Tuesday 11.35am-12.15pm

Where: Sky S1

Stream: RIM 101

Over the last three decades, records ‘basics’, along with the positions and roles of the people managing those records, have changed considerably in government agencies.  On the other hand some basics have not changed, they have merely moved with technology – Main Roads, which commenced in 1926, still use ‘basics’ that they started using in the 1930’s. What was right in the 70’s and the 80’s may not be right now, however it may still be for some things!

The role of information management has changed over time within our government agencies.  People not involved in records and information management often have a wrong perception of records and what records personnel actually do!  Business classification schemes have also changed – once upon a time, these were Keyword AAA now they are agency specific

Once upon a time libraries and records / information management areas  were treated as two quite distinct areas and ‘never the Twain shall meet’, but now a new trend has emerged where we are finding that these areas have merged, are found within the same Directorate / branch and in some cases are co-located and co-staffed. At the DoT this is the current scenario, and the library is seen as an information management asset.

Offsite storage and secondary storage and how this is managed has also changed. – what we did in the ‘old’ days, the changes, the challenges, the risks, and much more will be discussed. There is an increased awareness of the need for confidentiality and storage security of records both in-house and offsite, and the ‘clean box’ undertaking which some agencies have adopted as a best practice.

As part of WA government agencies records frameworks, having a Recordkeeping Plan is compulsory and a State Records Office requirement. However, this differs between the States and Territories, and we will look at how this is beneficial within WA and maybe give food for thought for other states and territories to follow suit.

User training and changes to training since ‘user enabling’ has occurred has resulted in changes to the training regime within an agency. There are now, ‘super users’ and training is now undertaken by formerly unheard of methods and is now the ‘norm’!

Cradle to grave - Bring out your dead!

Alison Petrou

Alison Petrou

Ally Howard (Snr Sgt)

Ally Howard (Snr Sgt)

Presenters: Alison Petrou - Victoria Police, VIC & Ally Howard (Snr Sgt) - Victoria Police, VIC

When: Wednesday 9.45am-10.25am

Where: Sky S1

Stream: RIM 101

Recordkeeping in any government organisation presents unique challenges, including the need to ensure that business as usual is not adversely impacted.  This presentation describes how this is being successfully achieved at Victoria Police. Over the past two years, the Enterprise Information Management team at Victoria Police have been implementing a state-wide project to bring Victoria Police information back into the organisation for retention or disposal.  The project, “Personal Holdings Amnesty”, consisted of the first ever face to face training sessions across the organisation, providing the foundations of recordkeeping, information assessment and archiving processes – as well as selling the need to return information into the organisation’s archive.  

 The ability to successfully implement this project required that all involved understood and supported the importance of well organised and consistent archived records at Victoria Police.  Through conducting trials and ongoing engagement with operational members, we identified the best organisational change approaches for implementing the amnesty and making recordkeeping processes consistent throughout the organisation.

 A manual was developed to assist both sworn (police officers) and VPS (Victorian Public Servants) staff how to assess their information for retention or disposal.  Both targeted and general communications were issued.  Training sessions were conducted with Senior Management (Sworn and VPS) and Administration staff.  This was to ensure that all levels within the organisation were familiar with the Retention and Disposal Authorities that govern the information generated and used on a daily basis.

 The impact that the project has had on records management at Victoria Police has been far reaching.  There has been a clear and consistent message delivered throughout the training sessions regarding the retention of information, recordkeeping basics and the appropriate and legal disposal of information.  The project has enabled the organisation to support administrative staff who manage police information on a daily basis, and additionally, has provided them with the tools and knowledge to be prepared and organised with their recordkeeping. 

 Moving forward, a training program, including an E-Learning Package will be developed to continue with the consistent message of best practice recordkeeping.

Developing a BCS for users - a case study from USC

Samantha Elkington-Dent

Samantha Elkington-Dent

Jane Brimacombe

Jane Brimacombe

Presenters: Samantha Elkington-Dent - University of the Sunshine Coast, QLD & Jane Brimacombe - University of the Sunshine Coast, QLD

When: Tuesday 10.50am-11.30am

Where: Sky S1

Stream: RIM 101

Information Management Services at the University of the Sunshine Coast recently took on the challenge of developing a new business classification scheme and mapping it to the current retention and disposal schedules. In this presentation, Jane Brimacombe and Samantha Elkington-Dent will share the story of how USC transformed their existing records classification scheme, based on now outdated terminology, into a new BCS which aligns with USC business needs and language. Jane and Samantha will share the reasons for the change and why the team decided to undertake the project in-house, rather than engaging a consultant.

They will discuss the processes the team undertook to develop the new BCS, how it was mapped to the R&D schedules, how the BCS was configured in the EDRMS, and how the BCS and R&D mapping is maintained. Most importantly, they will cover the user experience, such as user testing and user training activities undertaken by IMS, and how user feedback is actioned. Finally, they will delve into the all-important lessons learned and what you should consider if you are thinking of undertaking a similar project.

How do Knowledge workers perceive their recordkeeping role?

Peta Ifould

Peta Ifould

Presenter: Peta Ifould - WA Police, WA

When: Monday 4.20pm-5.00pm

Where: Sky S1

Stream: RIM 101

Paradigm shifts in the recordkeeping role has progressed in recent times from one undertaken by records professionals to one involving individual employees across an organisation. Yet the devolution of recordkeeping responsibilities to employees, known as knowledge workers, has occurred largely without us knowing their understanding, acceptance and preparedness for this new role. This has provided the motivation to find out how knowledge workers perceive their recordkeeping role.

So, who are the knowledge workers in our organisations and how much do we really know about them? Literature abounds with information about how we, as records and information management professionals, can best manage the systems and processes for achieving good information management practices in our organisations. Unfortunately, little is written about the people doing the actual recordkeeping tasks and their perceptions of this role. It is time we, as a profession, take stock of our changing roles and find out how our users as recordkeepers perceive their roles for creation, capture and organisation of records. It short, let’s reassess if we have got our RM 101 basics right by devolving our traditional recordkeeping roles to our users.

As a follow on from my previous presentation introducing this research project, come along to learn about our users, the knowledge workers. What does it say about them in the definition of ‘records management’ or ‘recordkeeping’? Where are they positioned within the records continuum model? What does it say about them in the recordkeeping legislation and the standards? What is said about how important they are in the organisational recordkeeping environment?

Interviews & Insights: Practitioners share their wisdom

Lisa Read White

Lisa Read White

Anne Cornish

Anne Cornish

Joy Siller

Joy Siller

Kye O'Donnell

Kye O'Donnell

Presenters: Lisa Read White - RIMPA, WA & Anne Cornish - Records Solutions, QLD & Joy Siller - Siller Systems Administration, VIC & Kye O'Donnell - Votar Partners, VIC

When: Tuesday 1.30pm-2.10pm

Where: Plaza Auditorium

Stream: RIM 101

An informative and interactive series of 10 minute interviews with RIM practitioners about the industry now and in the future.  Practitioners include:

Lisa Read White (Interviewing)

Anne Cornish

Joy Siller

Mimma Sardi

Kye O’Donnell

David Pryde (NZ perspective)

Shadrack Katuu (Europe perspective)

Let's get practical - Reinventing RM

Geraldine Aricheta

Geraldine Aricheta

Sarah Botur

Sarah Botur

Presenters: Geraldine Aricheta - New Zealand & Sarah Botur - Northland Regional Council, New Zealand

When: Monday 3.35pm-4.15pm

Where: Sky S1

Stream: RIM 101

In a fast-paced realm of new technologies referred to as process improvement enablers, we have lost touched with the basics of records management (RM) or what we refer to as contemporary recordkeeping practice. Technology has taken over recordkeeping, in fact has become far more complex that no one cares about recordkeeping anymore.

The purpose of this presentation is to explore how as records managers – from the perspectives of RM newbie and RM aficionado – fundamentally assess toolkits that includes policies, procedures, guidelines not only to create a stable records management that is compliant to any/all standards/legislations but also to ensure records is what it is meant to be – at the fingertips when required by the user. The basics of RM should set up practices that allow proactive collection and management of records to stay on top of any technology/process change. Let alone we don’t care about what EDRM/ECM system, storage type – we just want to get it right first and foremost.

Sarah with her 3 years RM work experience will talk about her view of the crucial first steps of records management. Geraldine will share how a comprehensive records management supports a business as she shares her 20+ years of RM work experience. Both believe that RM managers should step back and be objective and put in place RM 101 as a crucial phase and a proactive program that educates everyone on the basics of records management to get the basics right.

Records - what records? A services oriented marketing approach

Kaye England

Kaye England

Presenter: Kaye England - University of Southern Queensland, QLD

When: Monday 11:10am-11:40am

Where: Sky S1

Stream: RIM 101

Records & Information Management is not considered a glamorous field of work.  It is a responsibility that many people tend to leave till the last minute or pass onto someone else.  As information professionals, it can be difficult to tread the line between meeting client needs and compliance obligations.  Furthermore, constraints of time and resources (money, people, technology, etc.) impact on the information management service delivery.

The reason that we exist is to help our clients make and document business decisions and meet compliance requirements.  It is also true that we stand in the gap between the support of our clients and compliance – but at the essence of all that we do is a culture of service to assist in meeting the business needs of our clients.

In order to foster and raise the profile of recordkeeping in an organisation a multi-faceted service approach is necessary.  This presentation looks at a number of ways that information professionals can market their services as they are going about their day-to-day activities.  These include:

  • Recordkeeping education programs
  • Delivery of eDRMS training
  • Development and deployment of recordkeeping business tools
  • Managing records in enterprise business systems
  • Access and retrieval
  • Storage (electronic & physical)
  • Monitoring & reporting strategy
  • Self-Assessment

At the core of this marketing strategy is the value of people in both driving the program and also as recipients. It is imperative then that marketing in an information organisation becomes ‘everything we provide, everything we do and everything we say’.   The information professional therefore becomes a walking, talking advocate for awesome information management!

Serenity, courage and wisdom: Balancing perspective and requirements during EDRMS change

Kathryn Barton

Kathryn Barton

Presenter: Kathryn Barton - Western Power, WA

When: Tuesday 2.15pm-2.55pm

Where: Sky S1

Stream: RIM 101

Across three days, in June 2016, Western Power rolled out a replacement document and records management system, in tandem with a Microsoft Office upgrade, to 3200 computers and mobile devices at multiple locations across south-west WA.

11.8 million electronic documents (including versions), plus more than 287,000 physical files, 115,000 paper profiles, and 37,000 boxes, had been migrated into almost 658,000 new folders in the two months leading up to this point. But, as is always the case, numbers and statistics are not the whole story…..

Different requirements from records management and ICT teams, as well as the broader business, can often bring many challenging experiences to EDRMS implementations – even for a business with 17 years’ experience in using an enterprise-wide EDRMS. Limited budgets are common difficulties, as can be changing timeframes. Consider the combination of these challenges along with business-wide transformation, a halt to the project to defend its purpose; decisions regarding what to migrate from the old system; the introduction of new folder structure and document security models; and an “11th hour” complete re-migration of all items into the new system’s production database, and you have a window into Western Power’s most recent EDRMS implementation.

This paper will provide more detail about these challenges and the roles influencing their outcomes, as well as touching on the continuing challenges arising in the 12 months since implementation.

The forgotten piece in the accessibility puzzle

Lynda Leigh

Lynda Leigh

Presenter: Lynda Leigh - Bright Spark Speaking, ACT

When: Tuesday 3.35pm-4.15pm

Where: Sky S1

Stream: RIM 101

What’s the point of information if it’s not accessible?  And who’s responsible for ensuring that it is indeed accessible?  Can we do something more as information managers or is accessibility merely an ICT process?

After twenty odd years in the information management industry, public and private, small and large organizations, I want to share with you what I’ve learnt about about accessibility, why we need to fix it and how.

Access to the right information can change lives – it changed mine, will it change yours?

The roles of regulation in Information Management

Janita Stuart

Janita Stuart

Presenter: Janita Stuart - Worksafe NZ, New Zealand

When: Wednesday 11.15am-11.55am

Where: Sky S1

Stream: RIM 101

What is the role of regulation?  What is the role of information Management in most organisations, and what are the exceptions?  What (if any) are the alternatives to regulation?  How can we evaluate the IM regulatory agency in their role of enforcing and gaining compliance?

The void between knowing and doing

Wicka Simet

Wicka Simet

Presenter: Wicka Simet - Dept of Finance, ACT

When: Monday 1.30pm-2.10pm

Where: Sky S1

Stream: RIM 101

As records management professionals, we know how to identify a record, manage it, apply controls, provide access, sentence, and dispose of it. However, we are increasingly relying on end users who do not have these skills to create and capture information in a records management solution.

We need to understand if we have provided our users with the right tools to ensure information is managed appropriately. Do we support our users to make the most of the information they create? Are we planning for the future and the work habits of our users as they engage with ever changing technology? Have we looked at the strengths and weaknesses of our current processes and aligned these with the needs of our business or do we continue to impose inefficient records management tasks on our users in the name of compliance?

Having a records manager with little control over information at the point of creation leads to inconsistency in the categorisation of information and increases the resource commitment to ensure information remains discoverable over time. Interviews with everyday users provide a view that there is a void between knowing what to do and actually doing it. Training and education are obviously very important, but we know users will find ways to avoid engaging with traditional recordkeeping systems because they are often cumbersome and unintuitive.

This presentation focusses on compliant solutions versus compliant practices and government initiatives to achieve a practical balance.

Use it and lose it - Crush, kill, destroy!

Patrick Carswell

Patrick Carswell

Presenter: Patrick Carswell - University of Queensland, QLD

When: Wednesday 9.00am-9.40am

Where: Sky S1

Stream: RIM 101

We’re all quite diligent when it comes to capturing and managing information but often the disposal side of the equation is overlooked.  This session will examine the practicalities of records disposal including triggers, reporting, reviewing, seeking approval and the fun and games involved in destroying physical and electronic records.

User acceptance testing: What is it good for?

Angela Garnett

Angela Garnett

Presenter: Angela Garnett - Moreton Bay Regional Council, QLD

When: Monday 11.45am-12.25pm

Where: Sky S1

Stream: RIM 101

My presentation will consist of the collective experience gained by my more than 30 years working in the Records Management profession, including involvement in a number of EDRMS implementations (eg. RMSII, TRIM, DataWorks, Objective), EDRMS upgrades, data migrations (eg. RecFind, RMSII, TRIM, DataWorks, Objective) and platform conversions (eg. Oracle to SQL). Much of this knowledge was put to use in April 2010 when I was part of the team to amalgamate the EDRMS from the former Caboolture, Redcliffe & Pine Rivers Councils to a single solution for Moreton Bay Regional Council.
The presentation will explain what UAT is, why it is important and offer various methods on how to conduct this within an organisation. The UAT strategy will also provide agencies with suggestions on how to develop and test their own processes and how to use it as an opportunity to promote change within the business. It will be a basic, hands on account that will give novice system administrators ideas on how to approach UAT, while at the same time provide an innovative method for the more advanced participants. The presentation will not relate specifically to any system or vendor and will include anecdotes as well as practical advice.

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